RIP Filmmaker Alain Resnais

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The Best Films of Our Lives

(Editor’s note: Elaine had a particular connection to this director’s works, so she’s taking the reins for our tribute.)

Just before the glitter of the Oscars descended upon us yesterday, the world lost one of its greatest filmmakers, one who never actually won that golden statuette. Alain Resnais, the French director who changed the meaning of narrative and time in film, died on Saturday in Paris at the age of 91.

The son of a pharmacist, Resnais directed his first film when he was just 14 years old, an eight-millimeter endeavor now, somewhat appropriately, lost to time. He moved to Paris in 1939 to study acting, appearing as an extra in Marcel Carné’s “Les visiteurs du Soir” in 1942, and enrolling in France’s national film school upon is foundation in 1943. But it was in 1955 that he established himself with his powerful, haunting “Nuit et brouillard” (“Night and Fog”)…

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Keeping the World in Your Kitchen

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Life Aboard the Traveling Circus

I’ve never been a foodie. I can’t tell you the difference between cooking with vegetable oil or olive oil, I rarely use measuring cups, and I’m still not sure how much pasta to throw in the pot for two people. However, I can tell you that nobody appreciates a gourmet meal quite like a kid who grew up on TV dinners.

When I was little and I would go to the grocery store with my mother, it seemed normal to just point out what microwave meals I wanted for the week. When I would eat them at the end of a long day, I would always feel empty, a little gross, and always hungry, hungry for something with a taste; with flavor.

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Turkish lunch from Istanbul 

Getting invited to other people’s homes for dinner was always a real treat, which was why I made it a point to get in…

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Rest In Power: A Remembrance of Chokwe Lumumba

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The South Lawn

When it comes to politics and policy, I would not consider myself to be a particularly cynical person. Far from it actually; my faith in the power of social movements and grassroots change would not be as strong as it is if I did not hold to the notion that we will see an ultimate victory over the inequalities and oppressions that plague our society. I believe in people, and I believe in communities.

However, it would be accurate to assume that I do not have much faith in politicians or the political parties from which they emanate. I am, after all, old enough to remember a Barack Obama who said that he would walk a picket line as President and repeatedly affirmed his support for a public healthcare option. The breadth of politics today has become a game of Team Blue vs. Team Red, and opposition is based…

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